Category: Tabletop Loom

Geometric

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Front:

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I'm playing around with 7 shaft patterns on the little Louet W30 table loom. I like the front; I'm not as crazy about the back. I think I'll unweave (okay, I'll admit that unweaving may involve scissors) and try another geometric pattern. There are several interesing point twill patterns with this threading.

Back:

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Warping Cheat

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I haven't had the best of luck when it comes to warping using the warping board. I know I can do it–and I did with the table runner project–but I still look for shortcuts. This time, I decided to combine direct warping with the board, and it worked… kind of. I got all the 142 cotton warp threads onto the Ashford table loom just fine. Each time, I looped over the warping bar, and I kept every five strands separated with the raddle. I didn't use the lease sticks. Maybe I should have, but I couldn't quite wrap my brain around how to do that, too.
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So, it all wound on very nicely, I threaded all the heddles with a simple 1-2-3-4 repeat, sleyed the reeed, and then I got ready to weave. It's here I stopped because I didn't care for the way my selvedges looked when I used two separate colors. I gain some knowledge in one area (like warping) and then I realize I still need to learn something else (selvedges when using multiple colors… grrrrr…). I like learning, and I also like weaving, which is why this is lifelong journey.

Finished: Table Runner

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But it may become a pillow. The cotton (I Love This Cotton from Hobby Lobby) is very soft and squishy. It would make a nice pillow, I think. This was a fun, fast project. I had a nice moment when I successfully took the warp off the warping board and transferred it to the raddle. Didn't miss a thread! After that, I didn't mind the small challenges, like forgetting to have a floating slevedge. Oh well!

 

runner