Category: Loom Knitting

Scarves in Trees

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  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

 

It's true. Scarves have taken to the trees, and here are the pictures to prove it! 

The first, a bright orange mohair/merino scarf which was knitted on the blue Knifty Knitter loom with the garter stitch, literally jumped off the wearer's neck and wound itself around this branch. 

The second, a lovely rayon multicolored woven scarf, made on the Glimakra Emilia with a 10 dent heddle, scrambled away from the person attempting to photograph it and took refuge in a nearby Elm. 

Although the mohair scarf was captured and is now safely tucked into an arm of a jacket, the colorful rayon scarf is still a bit wild and will most likely be mailed out to a niece, who had recently requested a "blue, purple, red, yellow, white, and green" scarf. (Okay, there's not much blue or white, but it's close!) It is hoped she will be able to train the scarf to stay around her neck, which is where it belongs.

Testing the knitting board

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Last night, I knitted a small sample on the 28" Authentic Knitting Board using just 22 pegs (and 22 pegs on the opposite side, too). I used some Berroco merino and followed the beginning of the pattern for the Luxurious Alpaca Scarf. What I learned is that I need to tighten the gauge because the knitting was a little bit too loose and the ribbing, which starts after six rows of stockingette, was not very distinct.

This board can be adjusted. Do you see the bolt on the end? There's another one on the other end, too. You may remove the bolt, take out the spacer in between each side, and then put something smaller in between, such as a washer. I'll have to scrounge around in the toolbox tonight for something appropriate. The closer the two sides of the board, the tighter the gauge. So, if you're working with a chunky or bulky yarn, or if you want a very loose knit, you would actually put more space in between the two sides instead of keeping it snug.

I was brainstorming last night and came up with a way to, possibly, turn this two-sided loom into a round loom by adding my own type of spacer (a piece of wood with two metal pegs). That way, I could knit socks or other small-gauge items in the round. We'll see how it goes.

Dishtowels

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I just spotted these simple and antique-y dishtowels on the Purl Bee's website, and I wonder if a similar towel could be knitted on a loom. Aren't they lovely? I've knitted a few dishcloths in the past, but I've never been pleased with the large-gauge finished product; however, if I use the garter stitch throughout, I bet they would come out fairly nice, especially with the stripes. I also think these would be perfect as a double-knit project with a rake or knitting board, especially something in the small to fine-gauge size. Something to think about!

Categories: Loom Knitting

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Rectangle loom ribbed scarf

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I've been hankering to make a scarf, and after much thought, I chose a lovely Berroco Merino Pure in bordeaux. I decided to try the whole thing in a garter stitch pattern on the blue Knifty Knitter. After much trial and error, I frogged it and started again, this time on needles. After another try, I frogged it again, wondered why I really needed another scarf, and put everything away.

But today, I decided I really wanted another scarf, so I pulled out my little-used purple rectangle loom, an absoloutely enormous amount of Cascade Eco+ (7811) — one skein is about 475 yards — and an old sheet of wrapping patterns. Using just ten pegs (twenty if you count both the top and bottom) and a ribbed pattern, after just an hour or so, I had nearly two feet of my very, very purple scarf finished.

(NOTE: The drawings of the different ways to wrap came from the Yahoo Knifty Knitters Loom group files. It's under General Information and it's called "Various Wraps for a Board Loom." I'm using the Rib Wrap. It's also located here as a download.)