Category: Loom Knitting

Crazy Daisy Winder

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This winter I ventured outside of loom knitting by first purchasing a cheap, plastic potholder loom and then, after a few disasterous attempts at making my own, a professionally-made 4" square loom from Hazel Rose. With the potholder loom, I made a potholder (gasp!) and also a scarf. With the Hazel Rose 4" multiloom, I made several squares with different yarns, but then became focused and made a hat from the 1936 Weave-It pattern book. I also made several dolls.

Along the way, I discovered this cool, retro plastic loom in a thrift store, the 4" Wonder Weave! I liked it so much that my  husband and I made a video, which is nearing 6,000 hits on Youtube. I know that isn't a huge number, but considering I didn't think it would have 100 hits, it's pretty remarkable.

The idea of looms got me dreaming enough that my Christmas present was a 2' triloom from Hideaway Homestead. It's lovely, and it works like a charm. Within just a few days, I made a shawl!

So, that all led into my new interest–flower looms. The first time I saw flower looms, I yawned and turned away. But then… I just became interested, all at once. Much to my surprise I realized I owned one–the small flower loom Knifty Knitter. (So that's why the pegs come out!) And then, while walking through an antique store yesterday, I saw this interesting little box marked Crazy Daisy Winder. It was $.10. Yes, that's ten cents… a dime. The small, round brass disc has a knob in the center that, when twisted, makes 12 tiny metal rods come out. Those little spikes hold your yarn/thread/metal while you wind on your "petals." Then, you secure the center with a series of clever stitches (the backstitch), and viola! You have a flower. A second twist of the knob, the metal spikes disappear, and the flower comes off the loom. Pretty nifty. From what I can find out, these tiny flower looms were made in the 1940's.

Because my box and loom were missing instructions, my first attempts are pretty sad, so I'll share them with you another day. In the meantime, I've I discovered many wonderful sites dedicated to flower looms. Here are a few:

Coming soon: A Winter Recap (those felted mittens, a really floppy hat, a real picture of my shawl, and a slanted cupcake.)

Mittens, pre-felting

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image from www.flickr.com

I knit mittens on my blue Knifty Knitter loom, using the one loom mitten pattern. I changed the cuff by doing two rows of the garter stitch, plus I knitted a few extra rows. Because I used 100% wool, I then felted them.

They shrunk, a little. I'll post another picture soon.

They'll need another good wash/dry to get to the perfect size. The good thing about these is that I'm not really fond of them–if I lose one (which has been my habit this winter–I've lost one mitten and two gloves), then I'll have an excuse to make another pair, maybe in a better color. I bought one of those huge fisherman's wool skeins two years ago, and I've been using it for projects since then. Now, it's nearly gone. Hooray!

New yarn, new book…

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… I sense a new project heading my way.

Here's my new book: "Learn to Knit Cables on Looms," by Isela Phelps.

And here's my new yarn: "Marry" by Rozetti. There was something about the soft, fluffy texture that drew me in, so different that my usual 100% wool choices.

So, what'll it be? A cabled scarf, maybe? A cabled bag? Socks? Oh! Maybe a hat!

Hmmmmm…

Ruffled Cuff Wrist Warmers (I dare you to say that three times fast!)

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  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

My office is making attempts to save energy, and one of the ways we're accomplishing this is to lower the heat during the winter. And it's cold in January! So, I decided to make myself some wrist warmers to help keep my hands warm while I'm typing away at my job.

I designed these after conducting a fruitless search for wrist warmers (or hand warmers, or fingerless mitts… whatever you call them) made in the round on the blue Knifty Knitter. Having made mittens with the blue loom in the round, I figured there would be many different ideas out there. I found a few patterns, but most asked for small or regular gauge looms. Some were knitted as a flat panel on the blue loom and then stitched into a tube, but I just couldn't find a fairly easy, knitted-in-the-round pattern. So, I made one up off the top of my head!

BIG WARNING: Because I'm not a terrific pattern writer, there may be very easy ways to make a similar item without following these directions. Be creative! And please share with me what you did to improve it!

BIGGER WARNING: I was uncertain how to do the opening for the thumb so I made it up. The next time I make these, I'll probably remove the stitches from pegs 1-5 (Row 31 in the pattern below) and place them on a stitch holder, and then, after the item is off the blue loom, I may transfer the stitches onto the flower loom and knit three or four rows of the garter stitch. Stay tuned for improvements!

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RUFFLED CUFF WRIST WARMERS

Make two.

Needed:

  • Blue Knifty Knitter Loom (24 peg large gauge loom)
  • Knitting hook
  • Crochet hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Stitch makers to mark purling pegs (optional)
  • Yarn, approximately 125 yards: I used two strands of a worsted weight yarn (Patton 100% Merino Wool in Burgundy)

Notes:  

Instructions:

  1. Cast On. I use the cable cast on method.
  2. Rows 1-15 (CUFF): FS two pegs, PS two pegs. Keep up this pattern to create the cuff. Because the FS is a very snug stitch, the cuff looks ruffled when finished. Knit more rows for a longer cuff.
  3. Row 16-30 (BEGINNING OF HAND): FS.
  4. Row 31, PEGS 1-5 (THUMB OPENING): Lift loop from Peg 1 onto a crochet hook. Loop your working yarn over the hook, and pull it through Loop 1. Loop your working yarn again and pull through the loop. You now have one loop on your crochet hook. Lift loop from Peg 2 onto you hook and pull through the first loop. Loop your working yarn again and pull through the Loop 2. You now have one loop on your crochet hook. Move to Peg 3. Continue this pattern, creating a single chain, for Pegs 3, 4, and 5. Once Pegs 1-5 are safely crocheted, loop your final loop from your crochet hook onto Peg 6. You now have two loops on Peg 6, and no loops at all on Pegs 1-5.
  5. Row 31 (continued), Pegs 6-24: Knit off Peg 6. FS Pegs 7-24.
  6. Row 32, Pegs 1-5: You want to re-create new loops on your empty pegs. Use your working yarn and wrap Peg 1. Wrap Peg 1 a second time and KO. Wrap Peg 2. Wrap Peg 2 a second time and KO. Do this pattern for Pegs 3, 4, and 5. You will now have loops on all Pegs 1-5, and your working yarn is at Peg 6, ready to continue knitting in the round.
  7. Row 32 (continued), Pegs 6-24: FS Pegs 6-24.
  8. Rows 33-50 (TOP OF HAND): FS. NOTE: Knit as many rows as you'd like at this point. You want the mitt to reach to just below your knuckle area. Mine are a little too long.
  9. Row 51: PS
  10. Row 52-53: FS 2, PS 2. (Another option is: Row 51, PS. Row 52 FS. Row 53 PS.)
  11. Cast off. Use your tapestry needle to weave in any remaining threads.
  12. Finishing the Thumb: Use your crochet hook and yarn. Hook your crochet hook into one of the loops in the thumb opening, and crochet a single chain around the entire thumb opening, using up all the existing loops that border the thumb opening, one at a time. Be creative and make a fancy pattern if you so desire. If you find any open or weak areas areas after you're finished, reinforce these areas by either crocheting them or using some yarn and your tapestry needle and weaving in some reinforcing threads.