Tag: blue loom

Slippers Done

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I finished the meant-for-my-dad-but-now-are-my-husband's slippers this morning. I like this method of making the toe. I started the toe and, just like the heel, turned it but used the flat stitch this time. I then gathered the loops with a darning needle off the loom using a flat removal method (you zig zag across the loom). It's fun to pull the toe closed and see it all come together.

These were DEFINITELY about 1.5" too long for my dad, so it's back to the blue loom to make another pair. I had used 28 rows for the foot for these ones, and I think I'll make do with 20 this time. I've estimated that (with this yarn) there are four rows per inch. Wish me luck!

Here are the slippers, finished. One looks a little bit bigger. It really is the mysterious expanding slipper. I counted the rows about a million times, so I know they're the same size, and yet… and yet… One is HUGE! Now here's the really odd part–they fit B! I mean both of them, and last time I checked he didn't have different sized feet. Something strange is definitely going on.

So (deeeep breath), tomorrow morning I'm going to start yet another pair of brown slippers, hopefully size 10.5. Ho hum…

The Mysterious Expanding Slipper

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You learn things every day. What I learned today: Yarn stretches. Yes, I know. I should know this, but it must have escaped my mind somehow.

My dad had requested slippers, so I traced his current slipper on a piece of paper to be able to size them correctly. I was really excited about making these, because I came across Isela's pattern for ribbed socks (PDF) using the blue loom, and it would be my first try at a toe that didn't get drawn up with one thread like the top of a hat. (Note: I didn't make this pattern exactly, but it helped me understand increasing and decreasing on the loom–her pattern keeps those pesky holes from appearing in the heel.)

So, my dad has size 10.5 feet. Keep this in mind. I started with Lion Brand Thick and Quick in "wood" (yes, I must expand my yarn horizons) by knitting ten rounds, drawing up the bottom row, and knitting off to make a cuff. I then jumped right into the heel, and was pleased to find it went smoothly. When I started the actual foot, I carefully compared the growing sock with the tracing of my Dad's slipper. 10.5. Remember.

I knitted 28 rows and then knitted the toe using the flat stitch. I took off the whole thing using a flat panel removal method, like Isela recommends. And here's the result!

That's ONE HUGE SLIPPER!

B came home, took one look, and burst out laughing. What happened? It matched the paper tracing exactly, right up until the point where I took it off of the loom. So… the moral of the story is: yarn stretches, sometimes mysteriously so.

This story has a happy ending. Yes, I could have "frogged" it (I've learned that means Rip-it, Rip-it!) but it just so happens my husband's foot is size 12 so guess who's getting a pair of slippers? Sorry, Dad!

Slippers… Warm but ugly

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I made some slippers! And, wow!, are my feet cozy. Making slippers with the KK loom creates a slipper-sock. Not thin enough to be a sock, and yet not heavy enough to be a true slipper. Some people may want to put little sticky spots on the bottom to prevent slipping. I can admit they're not the most attactive, but it's okay. This is my first attempt at making something to wear, and it was super fun to see the slipper emerging from the loom. I used the blue loom and followed instructions at Yarn Gear, except I didn't quite do the heel right (worked out in the end), plus I didn't make the long ankle but shortened it into a doubled brim-like-cuff. Used Lion Thick and Quick yet again. (Must branch out to new yarn!!!)

Goals for slipper making: seamless toe! flat stitch on the bottom, and maybe, just maybe, some type of ribbed leg.

My dad asked for a pair, so we'll see how it goes. Did I mention how fast the KKs are? I know I did, but it's worth mentioning these slippers took about 1.5 hours apiece. I used one skein total, but I nearly ran out at the end, and just held my breath and kept on knitting.