Category: Weaving

Ziggy Zag Stitch

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Ziggyzagscarf

I started a scarf using the ziggy zag stitch. (You can find written directions for this stitch in the Yahoo Decor Accents Group. Go to Files, and then Stitches. Isela Phelps has written them up.)

To make this scarf, I’m using one strand of a beautiful blue wool blend. (Yarn Bee Mosiac Twist, Color: Moody Blue) and the red loom. This stitch needs an even number of pegs, so I cast on 12 pegs using the crochet cast on. Then I knitted one row and purled one row. This gives the scarf a non-curling edge. I then knitted back and forth for six rows using a stitch that’s described in Isela’s pattern. It’s a lot like the mock crochet stitch but instead of knitting three pegs at a time, you only use two. It’s an easy stitch to learn so I won’t describe it here.

Then, I started doing the ziggy zag stitch. This is a fun, pretty stitch but it can be a little complicated, so I’m posting some pictures of how I interpreted it. Please let me know if I’ve made a mistake.
Ziggyzag1
STEP ONE: To start, you flat stitch two pegs. In this picture (ziggyzag1) I’m doing the flat stitch on Peg One and Peg Two. Knit Peg One and then Peg Two. Don’t pull your yarn too tight. After you knit over Peg One and Peg Two, your yarn should be between Pegs Two and Three.
Ziggyzag2

STEP TWO: Bring the yarn BEHIND Peg Two, and then pull it in front of Peg One. Purl Stitch Peg One (ziggyzag2). Now, the yarn should be to the right of Peg One.

Ziggyzag3

STEP THREE: Bring the yarn BEHIND Peg One and in front of Peg Two so your yarn is now between Pegs One and Two. Purl Stitch Peg Two (ziggyzag3).

Now, you’re ready to move onto Pegs 3 and 4 and repeat Steps 1-3. Continue this pattern until you reach the end of your row. Then head back the other direction. (Check Isela’s pattern for clarification.)

This is a really pretty stitch. It gives a zig-zagged edging, too, so you may want to include a border on either side of your project.

A Lesson in Frogging

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I wanted to make a bag out of my Bollicine Victor yarn, and I had trouble coming up with a design, so I decided to start from the bottom and work my way up. I chose the green loom, and stated with the woven technique from the Provo Craft backpack. Another KK loomer has done this and she's outlined the way she created the woven bottom here. This was hard. I used one strand of yarn and by the end of six hours, my fingers were aching and I had an elbow cramp. No matter, it was done. It looked like a green plate.

I then had the decision of what stitch to use on the sides of the bag. I liked the bottom because it was a tight weave, and I could imagine actually using this bag to carry my knitting projects to and from work. After a little bit of trial/error, I ended up using a flat stitch with two strands of yarn. This started out just great, but then, about ten rows into it all, something strange started happening. The sides of the bag were caving in, almost like the cuff of a sock. I switched to my blue (Sky) yarn, and kept on going with the flat stitch. After just another five rows, I realized I wasn't making a bag, or a backpack. I was making a bowl!

Bowls are fine, but one out of rather floppy yarn looks interesting but isn't strong enough to actually hold anything unless it was felted. My yarn is 70% wool/30% acrylic and I decided I wouldn't risk trying to felt it, so I taught myself how to "frog," or how to unravel the rows so I wouldn't loose them all. This is easy at first, but gets harder when you try putting the loops back onto the loom.

I frogged all the blue and then got down to the final two rows of green. I fished out my stitch holders and looped in all the loose stitches I could find, and then I put the whole thing back onto the loom. This was only truly difficult near the end, where I was pulling really hard on the yarn to get it over the final few pegs. I highly recommend a stitch holder for any newbie like me who's trying to frog. It lets you salvage your work without too much swearing.

So now I'm using an e-wrap and it's a looser stitch, not like with the flat stitch when it turned into a rolled cuff. I really have no idea how this will turn out, which is one of the reasons why I like knitting. I always learn something new.

I still need to make myself some slippers! It's actually cold out, and I'd love to make a felted pair but I'm a little stumped with how to size them. I'm guessing I'd use the red loom, but maybe the green. I'm also thinking about making a cowl, although minus the pom-poms. Saaski here on Vox made one, and it's pretty neat. Something else I've discovered is that people often salvage yarn from thrift-store sweaters. Not only is this frugal, it seems like fun. Ashley Martineau has created a tutorial that is very detailed and helpful. This may be a good (but also time-consuming) way to acquire wool if you don't mind the work.