Category: Tutorials

Mock Crochet Neck Warmer / Cowl

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image from www.flickr.com 
I made this cowl by using two strands of Cascade 100% Merino Wool yarn and the round, yellow Knifty Knitter loom. It's a very loose neck warmer than hangs in folds but can be pulled over your head if you need a little extra warmth.>

The first time I started this, I used the regular e-wrap and one strand of yarn, but I didn't like the ladder-effect I was getting, so I frogged it all. The second time, I switched to using the mock crochet stitch, but it, too, was becoming too loose and airy, so I frogged it again. The third time's the charm–using two strands gave me the perfect thickness, but the stitch is more interesting than the normal e-wrap.

Here's a simple pattern I wrote up:

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Mock Crochet Neck Warmer

  • One skein yarn (Use two strands of worsted weight yarn or one strand of a bulky weight yarn.)
  • Yellow Knifty Knitter
  • Knitting tool

Cast on using your favorite method. (I use the cable cast on.) Start the Mock Crochet Stitch and continue throughout the entire project. Knit approximately 10" to 12". Cast off.

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There you have it! It's easy! Mine took approximately four hours from beginning to end.

Wonder Weave Loom

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I found a great small loom at a thrift shop–the Wonder Weave! It came with instructions, two books of patterns (copyright 1964), a needle, and a finished square someone attempted, maybe 40 years ago. The Wonder Weave makes 4″ squares or 2″x4″ oblongs. I’ve had it two days, and I’m only three squares shy of making that hat I wrote about last time.

I was so happy with my $6 find that my husband helped me make a video tutorial:

 

Wonder Weave Loom

Ziggy Zag Stitch

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Ziggyzagscarf

I started a scarf using the ziggy zag stitch. (You can find written directions for this stitch in the Yahoo Decor Accents Group. Go to Files, and then Stitches. Isela Phelps has written them up.)

To make this scarf, I’m using one strand of a beautiful blue wool blend. (Yarn Bee Mosiac Twist, Color: Moody Blue) and the red loom. This stitch needs an even number of pegs, so I cast on 12 pegs using the crochet cast on. Then I knitted one row and purled one row. This gives the scarf a non-curling edge. I then knitted back and forth for six rows using a stitch that’s described in Isela’s pattern. It’s a lot like the mock crochet stitch but instead of knitting three pegs at a time, you only use two. It’s an easy stitch to learn so I won’t describe it here.

Then, I started doing the ziggy zag stitch. This is a fun, pretty stitch but it can be a little complicated, so I’m posting some pictures of how I interpreted it. Please let me know if I’ve made a mistake.
Ziggyzag1
STEP ONE: To start, you flat stitch two pegs. In this picture (ziggyzag1) I’m doing the flat stitch on Peg One and Peg Two. Knit Peg One and then Peg Two. Don’t pull your yarn too tight. After you knit over Peg One and Peg Two, your yarn should be between Pegs Two and Three.
Ziggyzag2

STEP TWO: Bring the yarn BEHIND Peg Two, and then pull it in front of Peg One. Purl Stitch Peg One (ziggyzag2). Now, the yarn should be to the right of Peg One.

Ziggyzag3

STEP THREE: Bring the yarn BEHIND Peg One and in front of Peg Two so your yarn is now between Pegs One and Two. Purl Stitch Peg Two (ziggyzag3).

Now, you’re ready to move onto Pegs 3 and 4 and repeat Steps 1-3. Continue this pattern until you reach the end of your row. Then head back the other direction. (Check Isela’s pattern for clarification.)

This is a really pretty stitch. It gives a zig-zagged edging, too, so you may want to include a border on either side of your project.

Mitten Details

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There were a few people on the Yahoo groups who wanted to know how many rows I had to knit when I made the mittens (below) with the flat stitch. Here’s my conversion from the One Loom Mitten. Please follow her pattern and just use these numbers in exchange if you want to try the flat stitch. This makes a medium-sized mitten:

Cuff: Cast on. Knit 16 Rows, bring bottom row up and put original stitches on pegs. Knit off. (This is just like making a brim on a hat.)

Bottom section of the body: Knit 12 Rows.

Thumb: Using 6 pegs, knit back and forth for a total of 29 Rows.

Top section of the body: Knit 18 Rows.

Decrease (Note: I leave the loops on the pegs when I decrease this way):

  • Using the first peg of your thumb (let’s say it’s Peg 1), knit to Peg 12.
  • Knit from Peg 11 to Peg 1.
  • Knit from Peg 2 to Peg 11.
  • Knit from Peg 10 to Peg 3.
  • Knit from Peg 4 to Peg 10.
  • Knit from Peg 9 to Peg 5.
  • Knit from Peg 6 to Peg 8.

Now, you need to knit Peg 8 to Peg 12 and start the decreases on the opposite side of the mitten. Do the same decreases as above by change the numbers to 13-24.

NOTE: My decreases were a little choppy. If you find a smoother way to do decreases, please let me know. You can always follow the gathering method from the original pattern.

Bind off: I used a flat panel removal method to take off the mitten. Turn it inside out and stitch it. Also, stitch the sides of the thumb.

Now, knit the second mitten!