Ziggy Zag Stitch

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Ziggyzagscarf

I started a scarf using the ziggy zag stitch. (You can find written directions for this stitch in the Yahoo Decor Accents Group. Go to Files, and then Stitches. Isela Phelps has written them up.)

To make this scarf, I’m using one strand of a beautiful blue wool blend. (Yarn Bee Mosiac Twist, Color: Moody Blue) and the red loom. This stitch needs an even number of pegs, so I cast on 12 pegs using the crochet cast on. Then I knitted one row and purled one row. This gives the scarf a non-curling edge. I then knitted back and forth for six rows using a stitch that’s described in Isela’s pattern. It’s a lot like the mock crochet stitch but instead of knitting three pegs at a time, you only use two. It’s an easy stitch to learn so I won’t describe it here.

Then, I started doing the ziggy zag stitch. This is a fun, pretty stitch but it can be a little complicated, so I’m posting some pictures of how I interpreted it. Please let me know if I’ve made a mistake.
Ziggyzag1
STEP ONE: To start, you flat stitch two pegs. In this picture (ziggyzag1) I’m doing the flat stitch on Peg One and Peg Two. Knit Peg One and then Peg Two. Don’t pull your yarn too tight. After you knit over Peg One and Peg Two, your yarn should be between Pegs Two and Three.
Ziggyzag2

STEP TWO: Bring the yarn BEHIND Peg Two, and then pull it in front of Peg One. Purl Stitch Peg One (ziggyzag2). Now, the yarn should be to the right of Peg One.

Ziggyzag3

STEP THREE: Bring the yarn BEHIND Peg One and in front of Peg Two so your yarn is now between Pegs One and Two. Purl Stitch Peg Two (ziggyzag3).

Now, you’re ready to move onto Pegs 3 and 4 and repeat Steps 1-3. Continue this pattern until you reach the end of your row. Then head back the other direction. (Check Isela’s pattern for clarification.)

This is a really pretty stitch. It gives a zig-zagged edging, too, so you may want to include a border on either side of your project.

Bunnies!

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Bunny2
Bunnyears
What better way to spend a snowy weekend than knitting a couple of cute bunnies? We may have had 20″ of snow this weekend, but these little, cute, pink, fluffy bunnies didn’t seem to care. I used the blue loom and the free pattern (PDF) from the Loom Knitting store. These bunnies knit up in about an hour. You start by knitting a flat panel using 15 pegs. Then, you knit two ears, a tail, and you sew it and stuff it.
For my first bunny I used two strands of Bernat Softee Chunky. When I started the ears, I accidently read the pattern wrong and knitted at least two rows too many, but it looks sort of cute that way, more like Amigurumi than a bunny. For this bunny, I kept the “knit” side facing out.
I then did another one using two strands of Moda Dea Dream (Color: Blush). It’s very soft and fluffy. I probably should have used three strands because they were so skinny… Next time, maybe. This one I followed the ear pattern more closely and they turned out pretty cute. This bunny has the “purl” side facing out.
These bunnies are very small–no more than six or seven inches long. I’d like to knit a bigger bunny, maybe using the blue loom but instead of just 15 pegs, I’d use all 24 pegs. I’m guessing I’d have to knit at least 40 rows. If it keeps snowing, maybe I’ll do just that!

P.S. Hey, all you Vox-ers. Did you know you can now customize your banner? B designed this new one of my yarn lovin’ cat!

Mitten Details

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There were a few people on the Yahoo groups who wanted to know how many rows I had to knit when I made the mittens (below) with the flat stitch. Here’s my conversion from the One Loom Mitten. Please follow her pattern and just use these numbers in exchange if you want to try the flat stitch. This makes a medium-sized mitten:

Cuff: Cast on. Knit 16 Rows, bring bottom row up and put original stitches on pegs. Knit off. (This is just like making a brim on a hat.)

Bottom section of the body: Knit 12 Rows.

Thumb: Using 6 pegs, knit back and forth for a total of 29 Rows.

Top section of the body: Knit 18 Rows.

Decrease (Note: I leave the loops on the pegs when I decrease this way):

  • Using the first peg of your thumb (let’s say it’s Peg 1), knit to Peg 12.
  • Knit from Peg 11 to Peg 1.
  • Knit from Peg 2 to Peg 11.
  • Knit from Peg 10 to Peg 3.
  • Knit from Peg 4 to Peg 10.
  • Knit from Peg 9 to Peg 5.
  • Knit from Peg 6 to Peg 8.

Now, you need to knit Peg 8 to Peg 12 and start the decreases on the opposite side of the mitten. Do the same decreases as above by change the numbers to 13-24.

NOTE: My decreases were a little choppy. If you find a smoother way to do decreases, please let me know. You can always follow the gathering method from the original pattern.

Bind off: I used a flat panel removal method to take off the mitten. Turn it inside out and stitch it. Also, stitch the sides of the thumb.

Now, knit the second mitten!

Mittens!

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Mitten
Mittens

I’ve always wanted to try to knit mittens, so I bought yet another skein of Lion’s Brand Wool Ease Thick & Quick and gave it a shot. I tried this pattern which uses the blue loom and knits the mitten in one piece, thumb included. The only sewing is the top and the sides of the thumb. I chose the flat stitch so the mitten wouldn’t be loose, and I think they ended up okay. Not great, because I changed the top of the mitten. The pattern called for a gathered top, like a hat, but I decided to do decreases and stitch the top like a flat panel.

Did it work? Yes and no. For one thing, using the flat stitch made me have to guess the number of rows–I needed more than the pattern called for because the flat stitch is so tight. Also, I have a lot to learn about decreasing because the mittens look a little off on the top, plus my stitching is bumpy. They work, though, and I was able to toss snowballs for my dog to chase while my hands stayed warm. These would be even better if I could line them with flannel, but until then, they’re just fine.

My other cat, the one who doesn’t bother me when I knit unlike this one, just had to take a look. I think she was impressed. I can always tell when she likes something because she lies down on it, and that’s just what she did.