Tag: yellow loom

Yellow Loom Hat

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Yellowloomhat2
Yellowloomhat1

In the past, I knitted a hat with the large gauge yellow Knifty Knitter loom, but it turned out too big. The yarn was an acrylic mix that didn't have much stretch, and so the hat was droopy. However, I feel the green loom is a little too small, so I tried the yellow loom again, this time using Lion Brand Wool Ease Thick and Quick. I decided to make a very long brim so I could fold it up. I did a K2, P2 brim, but because the yellow loom has an uneven number of pegs, I had to do a K3 on the final three pegs to keep the ribbing even. I knit about 4" (or 20 rows) for a brim, and then switched to the regular e-wrap stitch.

On the Yahoo Knifty Knitter group, I had read about finishing off a hat without doing the typical gather and I wanted to try it, so when I got near the top, I divided the loom into four sections with stitch markers (10 pegs, 10 pegs, 10 pegs, and 11 pegs), and decreased one peg as I knitted back and forth. For example, I knitted Peg 1 through Peg 10. On the way back I decreased one loop, and then knitted Peg 9 through Peg 1. Then I decreased another loop and knitted Peg 2 through Peg 9. When I got down to the final peg, I wrapped it with the working yarn, cut the yarn to about 12", and knitted the peg off, pulling the yarn through the final loop. Decreasing in this manner creates a triangle. I then did the final three sections (on the fourth section, I decreased two pegs on the first row because it has 11 pegs, not 10 like the others.) I turned the hat inside out and stitched the triangles together on the seams using the mattress stitch. 

I really like my new hat. It's warm, fits just right, and looks great on a pumpkin.

Mock Crochet Neck Warmer / Cowl

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image from www.flickr.com 
I made this cowl by using two strands of Cascade 100% Merino Wool yarn and the round, yellow Knifty Knitter loom. It's a very loose neck warmer than hangs in folds but can be pulled over your head if you need a little extra warmth.>

The first time I started this, I used the regular e-wrap and one strand of yarn, but I didn't like the ladder-effect I was getting, so I frogged it all. The second time, I switched to using the mock crochet stitch, but it, too, was becoming too loose and airy, so I frogged it again. The third time's the charm–using two strands gave me the perfect thickness, but the stitch is more interesting than the normal e-wrap.

Here's a simple pattern I wrote up:

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Mock Crochet Neck Warmer

  • One skein yarn (Use two strands of worsted weight yarn or one strand of a bulky weight yarn.)
  • Yellow Knifty Knitter
  • Knitting tool

Cast on using your favorite method. (I use the cable cast on.) Start the Mock Crochet Stitch and continue throughout the entire project. Knit approximately 10" to 12". Cast off.

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There you have it! It's easy! Mine took approximately four hours from beginning to end.

Wind-powered knitting machine

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You can find the strangest things on youtube, like this video of a knitting machine powered by a windmill:

wind knitting machine

 

And this old-fashioned sock knitting machine. It's mesmerizing to watch. (Okay, it's mesmerizing to watch if you like watching vintage sock knitting machines.)

Gearhart Sock Knitting Machine

Current project: I'm making a cowl on the yellow Knifty Knitter loom. I started it by using the pattern found at the Ben Franklin site, but after about 15 rows, I decided I didn't like the look of the plain e-wrap stitch. I was using just one strand of a Cascade wool in blue, and it was looking very ladder-ish. So, I frogged it all and began again, this time using the mock crochet stitch (instructions here). It's a very easy and pretty way to vary your loom knitting.

Finished: shawl

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Shawl1
Shawl2

Last night I finished knitting this little shawl on the yellow Knifty Knitter.I used the pattern I listed below in a previous posting, by Rostitchery. Although I had some trouble decreasing, in the end, it turned out. Rowena had instructions to put the last loop on the near peg and KO. Then, wrap that “new” last peg, KO, and continue on down the row. I found this made the edge tight, not loopy like on my increase side. To try to make it match a little more, I would do just as she said by pulling the last loop to the second-to-last peg and KO. Then I would double wrap that final peg, knit 2-over-1, and continue down the row. Because the yarn is bulky and also varies in thickness, it passes just fine.

I used Moda Dea Cache in Tootsie, about 2.5 skeins. This is not a favorite yarn of mine. In fact, I bought it for $1/skein at Goodwill months ago. It makes a cute shawl, though!

My only thought on this shawl is whether or not is should be blocked. It fits snugly around the shoulders, and I like it that way, so I don’t think I will, but we’ll see.

This is a fast project to knit. I estimate it took me about five hours total.